Showing 33 results

Authority record

Baudoin, Edmond

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-BAU01
  • Person
  • 1942-04-23/

Edmond Baudoin was born in Nice, France, on 23 April 1942. He left school at 16 and completed his military service. After this, he trained and worked as an accountant at a luxury hotel in Nice. In his early thirties, he left accounting to draw. Through this work, he eventually started working on comic books and graphic novels. He published his first book in 1981 (“Civilisation”). As well as writing his own texts, Baudoin has collaborated with many authors, including JMG Le Clézio, Fred Vargas, Frank, Jacques Lob, L’abbé Pierre, Céline Wagner, Tahar Ben Jelloun, Philippe Chartron, Carol Vanni, Mircea Cartarescu.
His work has been rewarded with a number of prizes.
In 2015, working with the mathematician Cédric Villani, Baudoin published “Les Rêveurs lunaires” which tells the stories of Werner Heisenberg, Alan Turing, Leó Szilárd and Hugh Dowding.

Cameron, Graham Neil

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-CAM01
  • Person
  • 1951-07-22/

Graham Cameron was born in Edinburgh on 22 July 1951.

After initial training in psychology, Cameron spent the majority of his career working with databases. He joined EMBL in 1982 to work on the Nucleotide Sequence Data Library and was subsequently involved of the development of the Data Library into a new EMBL outstation, the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI).

Stelzer, Ernst Hans Karl

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-STE01
  • Person
  • 1959/

Stelzer was born and brought up in Frankfurt-am-Main, DE in 1959. Between 1977 and 1982, he was a student of Physics at the Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt, before obtaining his Diploma (German Diplom) in 1983 from the Max-Planck-Institut für Biophysik, also in Frankfurt. Stelzer then joined EMBL as a PhD student in Physical Instrumentation and his PhD was awarded by Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, in Heidelberg, DE. His thesis was entitled "Zur Bedeutung des konfokal arrangierten Rasterlichtmikroskops in der Molekularbiologie." Between 1986 and 1987, Stelzer was a postdoctoral fellow in Physical Instrumentation, before becoming a Project Leader in 1987 and then a Group Leader in 1989.

In 2009, Stelzer took up a position of Principal Investigator at Goethe University in Frankfurt. He left EMBL in 2011 to take up a post of Professor in the Life Sciences, again at Goethe-Universität.

Dubochet, Jacques

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-DUB01
  • Person
  • 1942-06-08/

Dubochet was born in Aigle, CH and was raised in the Swiss cantons of Vaud and Valais. He attended the École polytechnique de l'université de Lausanne (which became the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne in 1969) from 1962 to 1967, receiving a degree in physical engineering (in French: ingénieur physicien). In 1969, he obtained a certificate in molecular biology from the Univeristy of Geneva, after which he worked under the supervision of Eduard Kellenberger between the University of Geneva and the Biozentrum of the University of Basel (founded in 1971). Dubochet obtained his doctorate in 1973 (“Contribution to the use of dark-field electron microscopy in biology”).

In 1978, Dubochet joined EMBL in Heidelberg as a Group Leader of the Electron Microscopy Applications Group within the Division of Biological Structures( later the Biological Structures Programme). He stayed at EMBL until 1987 when he joined the University of Lausanne, where he stayed until his retirement in 2007, after which he stayed on as an honorary professor.

In 2015, Dubochet received EMBL's first Lennart Philipson Award (announced in 2014-12). On 2017-10-04, Dubochet is awarded a Nobel Prize in Chemsitry, shared equally with Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for the development of cryo-electron microscopy which enables the determination of high-resolution structures of biomolecules in solutions. His received the prize from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in Stockholm, SE on 2017-12-10.

Kafatos, Fotis Constantine

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-KAF01
  • Person
  • 1940-04-16/2017-11-18

Fotis Constantine Kafatos was born on 16 April 1940 in Heraklion, Crete, GR. He completed his primary and secondary education there (Lyceum “Korais”). In 1959, he went to study zoology at Cornell University (Ithaca, NY, US) on a scholarship from Anne Gruner Schlumberger. He graduated with an AB (High Honors) one year early in 1961, having worked with Thomas Eisner, a pioneer of chemical ecology.

In 1961, Kafatos went to Harvard University (Cambridge, MA, US) and obtained an MA in 1962 and a PhD in 1965. His doctoral thesis was entitled “The escape of moths from the cocoon: biochemical, physiological, morphological, and developmental studies” and was advised by Dr. Carroll Milton Williams. Kafatos stayed on at Harvard as an Instructor of Biology (1965), Assistant Professor of Biology (1965-1969) and then Professor of Biology (1969-1994). During his tenure at Harvard, he divided his time with Greece, holding part-time faculty positions at the University of Athens (1972-1982) and the University of Crete (1982-1993). He also founded and headed the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Research Centre of Crete (1982-1993).

During his time in the United States, Kafatos was among the first to apply molecular biology methods to the study of animal development. In particular, he contributed to the development of the complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, cloning and sequencing, and the dot-blot method for detecting, analyzing, and identifying proteins.

In 1993, Kafatos became the third Director General of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), succeeding Lennart Philipson in the post. Under his stewardship, the Monterotondo Outstation (now known as EMBL Rome), focusing on mouse biology, was opened (1999) on the Adriano Buzzati-Traverso Campus of the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR).

During his directorship, Kafatos continued to carry out research. He studied, in particular, malaria and its major vector, Anopheles gambiae. This work led to the sequencing of the A. gambiae genome in 2002 and opened new avenues of study regarding the Plasmodium (malaria parasite) and its interactions with its host.

In 2005, after his tenure at EMBL ended, Kafatos moved to Imperial College, London, GB, where he held the Chair of Insect Immunogenomics. In December 2005, Kafatos was elected the first chairman of the European Research Council (ERC), which was launched in 2007. In this role, Kafatos was able to support excellent, investigator-initiated fundamental European research.

In 2007, he also became an Adjunct Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Kafatos died on 2017-11-18 in Crete.

Karsenti, Éric

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-KAR01
  • Person
  • 1948-09-10/

Eric Karsenti was born in Paris (FR). After growing up in Paris, he attended the University of Paris (becoming the University Paris-VII in 1971) between 1967 and 1972, receiving a degree in sciences. Between 1972 and 1979, he carried out doctoral research in immunocytochemistry at the Institut Pasteur. He was awarded a doctorate (thèse dÉtat) in 1979 for his thesis entitled "Le rôle de la membrane plasmique et du cytosquelette dans la stimulation des lymphocytes par la Concanavaline A: recherche d'interactions entre le cytosquelette, la membrane plasmique et le génôme." In 1976, he had been recruited by the CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique). Between 1979 and 1981, he worked at the Institut Pasteur as a researcher in cell and molecular biology, before taking up a postdoctoral position at the University of California, San Francisco (1981-1984). He then worked at the CNRS Centre for Experimental Cytology (Centre de cytologie expérimentale) in Paris (1984-1985) before moving to EMBL in Heidelberg in 1985.

Working in the Cell Biology Programme, Karsenti’s group researched the microtubules’ organization during the cell cycle. From 1994 to 1997, jointly with Christian Boulin, he is the programme coordinator for the Physical Instrumentation/Cell Biophysics Programme (then the Cell Biophysics Programme from 1995 to 1997). In 1998, the Cell Biophysics Programme became the Cell Biology and Biophysics Programme, and Karsenti became its programme coordinator until 2009. (In 2009, he shared this position with Jan Ellenberg.) In 2010, he became a Senior Scientist at EMBL and in 2014, Karsenti became a Visiting Scientist at EMBL.

During his time at EMBL, Karsenti’s research continued to focus on the organization of the cell during its cycle.

Between 2000 and 2003, he was also the director of the Institut Jacques Monod in Paris.

In 2009, Karsenti began working on Tara Oceans, a scientific expedition seeking to understand the key role and place of marine microorganisms in global ecosystems. Between 2009 and 2013, the expedition sailed the global ocean to gather specimens from more than 210 stations.

He was elected to EMBO in 1993, and in 2015, he was awarded the CNRS Gold Medal (Médaille d’Or du CNRS).

Birnstiel, Max Luciano

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-BIR01
  • Person
  • 1933-07-12/2014-11-15

Birnstiel was born to a Swiss father and a Brazilian mother in Brazil on 1933-07-1. His family moved to Zurich, CH, when he was 5.
Between 1952 and 1959, we attended the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich). There, he studied botany under the supervision of Albert Frey-Wyssling. His doctoral thesis, awarded in 1960, was entitled: "Über das Redoxpotential lebender und absterbender Pflanzengewebe (Tabakverbräunung)" (DOI: https://doi.org/10.3929/ethz-a-000150890).
Between 1960 and 1963, he carried out a postdoc with Professor James Bonne at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, California, US. Following this, he moved to the University of Edinburgh in the Epigenetics Research Group in the Genetics Department, having been recruited by Conrad Waddington. By the time be left Edinburgh in 1972, Birnstiel had become a professor.
In 1972, the University of Zürich offered Birnstiel a position in the university's Institute of Molecular Biology II. (The Institute of Molecular Biology I was, at this time, headed by Charles Weissmann.) Birnstiel would stay at the institute for 14 years before moving to Vienna, AT, in 1986. There, he was the founding Director of the Boehringer Institute of Molecular Pathology. He left the Institute in 1996 to return to Switzeland, where died of complications of cancer in 2014.

Williamson, Keith Edward

  • DE-EMBL ID-P-WIL01
  • Person
  • 1948-01-12/

Williamson was born in Camberwell, London (GB) on 12 January 1948, and grew up in Bermondsey, London. His family later moved to Dartford, Kent, where he completed his education in 1966. He spent the majority of his career working for the British government before joining EMBL in 2001, from which he retired in December 2015.

As a parting gift to EMBL, he offered EMBL a large statue of the letter G, located at EMBL in Heidelberg. Alongside the initials of the Advanced Training Centre (ATC), the G represents guanine when A, T and C stand for adenine, thymine and cytosine respectively, forming the four nucleobases of DNA.

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